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Gigaba blames poverty for increasing human trafficking cases

Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba says poverty makes many vulnerable to human traffickers.

file: Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba arrives at The House Group to talk about his department's efforts to curb human trafficking. Picture: Masa Kekana/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba says poverty is increasing human trafficking with some families selling young relatives to put food on the table.

Yesterday, Gigaba visited a safe house, which accommodates teenage girls who have been rescued from human traffickers.

The minister was greeted by a jovial group of teenage girls at the safe house.

But managing director of the home Riana Gasper says all of the teenagers have gone through horrific experiences with some being sold to traffickers by their own families.

"That is purely because the families are so poor and the easier way to look after other children in the families is to sell one of your children."

Gigaba says poverty makes many vulnerable to human traffickers.

"In some instances children become victims of human trafficking because of the events of their family members whether it's the parents or relatives of the children."

He says the department has strengthened its ties with law enforcement agencies to tackle the problem of modern day slavery.

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