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Pink Ladies: 95% of missing kids found alive in 2015

The organisation has helped find 365 children who went missing last year.

The Pink Ladies logo. Picture: pinkladies.org.za
missing children,The Pink Ladies,Pink Ladies
Local

JOHANNESBURG – Missing persons organisation the Pink Ladies say more than 95 percent of the missing children they dealt with were found alive last year.

The organisation was established in 2007 when seven-year-old Sheldean Human went missing from her home in Pretoria West and a group of ladies, dressed in pink, took to the streets to look for her.

Since then, the organisation has taken on thousands of cases, assisting the police and have now released statistics for the first time.

Dessie Rechner, a 70-year-old woman who resides in Cape Town, is the founder of the organisation that has helped find 365 children who went missing last year.

"The 349 were alive and 16 were deceased. These stats gave us a 95.6 percent recovery rate."

Rechner says social media has helped to distribute pictures and information of missing children and adults.

She says many children run away from home.

"Let's say 70 percent are runaways because of mainly social issues."

Rechner says the Pink Ladies have been assisting police and over the years have helped solve a number of cases.

(Edited by Tamsin Wort)

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