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Working person supports three who don't - stats

Statistics say there has been an improvement in the number of people who have employment.

A domestic worker busy ironing. Picture: EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The South African Institute of Race Relations (SAIRR) on Monday said new research indicated that the average South African with a job supported themselves and three other people who do not work.

It also said this was an improvement from 1994, when workers supported an average of 3.8 people.

SAIRR said there were also big differences in the ratios for the different races.

The institute's researcher Lucy Holborn said this figure showed the economy grew over time.

"Unemployment has been consistently high as a proportion of the labour force. The actual number of people in jobs has gone up but that has been affected by recession."

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