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Girls more likely to be killed by moms

Many child homicide cases are falling between the cracks of the criminal justice system, according to MRC.

Many child homicide cases are falling between the cracks of the criminal justice system, according to MRC.

CAPE TOWN - The Medical Research Council of South African (MRC) on Wednesday said too many child homicide cases are falling through the cracks of the criminal justice system.

The council's National Female and Child Homicide study shows three children are killed in the country daily.

The findings were discussed at a joint meeting of the Health, and Women, Children and People with Disabilities portfolio committees in Parliament, Cape Town.

Throughout the presentation, council officials emphasised that rates of child homicides are grossly underestimated, partly due to the under-reporting of cases.

The council's Shanaaz Mathews cited a number of cases where child homicides were either ignored by authorities or dockets went missing.

"We see that mothers are overly presented in the killings of female child homicide. So 45 percent of perpetrators for female homicide are mothers."

Girls are more likely to be killed by their mothers at home, while boys between the ages of 15 and 17 are more likely to be shot dead.

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