Dead bodies on show in CT

A preserved corpse is seen on display as part of the Body Worlds exhibition by Dr. Gunther von Hagens at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town on Wednesday, 31 October 2012. Von Hagens is a controversial German anatomist who invented the technique for preserving biological tissue specimens called plastination. Picture: Nardus Engelbrecht/SAPA
A preserved corpse, 'playing a saxophone', on display as part of the Body Worlds exhibition in Cape Town. Picture: Sapa.
A preserved corpse is seen on display as part of the Body Worlds exhibition in Cape Town. Picture: Sapa.
The preserved corpse of a woman, which is part of the Body Worlds exhibition at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. Picture: Sapa.
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CAPE TOWN - Ever wondered what the inside of a real human head looks like?

The world famous Body Worlds and The Cycle of Life exhibition on Thursday opened at the V & A Waterfront in Cape Town.

A few human bodies, with the skin removed, have been preserved through plastination and were put on display.

Exhibition organisers said it is an educational treat, while others said it is not for the faint of heart.

One cadaver was in compromising positions, with the man jumping over a wall.

A pair of blackened smoker's lungs and an elderly man's head sliced in half was also on display.

The idea of seeing a dead body might be a frightening thought, but those who visited the exhibition alongside Eyewitness News, emerged smiling.

The show is running in Cape Town for the next three months.

Johannesburg could get its turn in 2013.

Organisers said 13,000 people across the world, including South Africans, have signed up to have their bodies plastinated after they die.

(Edited by Katleho Mogase)