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CT picking up World Cup pieces

The City of Cape Town is still suffering economically a year after the World Cup.

Cape Town Stadium. Picture: capetown.gov.za.
soccer,Cape Town stadium,2010 Soccer World Cup,Cape Chamber of Commerce in Cape Town
Sport Local

CAPE TOWN - The Cape Chamber of Commerce on Monday said the City of Cape Town is still suffering from hosting the Soccer World Cup two years ago.

Monday marks exactly two years since the kick-off of the tournament.

Several billion Rands was spent on a new transport system and the building of a new stadium.

The chamber’s Gordon Metter said these appear to be more of a headache, rather than a benefit to the city.

“I don’t think the World Cup produced the benefits that we hoped for. We are sitting with a stadium that is used very poorly, so it costs the city council a large amount of money to maintain it.”

Metter said not many opportunities were created by the tournament.

“I don’t believe we can categorically say that the World Cup brought extra business or boosted the economy.” 

But, Cape Town Tourism bosses said the 2010 spectacle has put the city on the map as a must see destination.

According to the latest statistics, Cape Town has seen a 14 percent rise in international arrivals since the tournament.

Cape Town Tourism CEO Mariette du Toit-Helmbold said tourism numbers are still far off from what was forecast two years back.

“From a long-term perspective, it doesn’t happen overnight that people change their minds about a destination and hop on a plane. It is continual marketing.”

Meanwhile, the City of Cape Town last week unveiled a plan to make good use of the Cape Town Stadium in Greenpoint.

The city’s mayoral committee will be approaching provincial government with the plan, which intends to commercially sustain the stadium.

The committee want to ease restrictions of the stadium, its forecourt and Green Point Park to make way for nightclubs, restaurants, coffee shops and sports bars.

The plan suggests the provincial government develop suites in the stadium, secure tenants and lease commercial space to retailers, conference organisers, offices and even commercial parking.

The Cape Chamber of Commerce welcomed the move.

(Edited by Lisa Bartlett)

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